Positive Aging: How To Be Your Own Valentine

Be your own valentine for a perfect Valentine’s Day!

Valentine’s Day – though unbelievably commercial –  can be nice.  Hearts and flowers and candy.  What’s not to like?  That’s all well and good if you’re getting hearts and flowers and candy.  But what if you’re not?  Positive aging means more than just being positive about other people!

We’re often so busy – even in retirement – taking care of others that we forget to take care of ourselves.  Here’s a solution to that problem. Continue reading Positive Aging: How To Be Your Own Valentine

Retirement 1: Creating a Retirement Life Plan

Okay, so you have this precious new gift.  40-60 hours a week that you haven’t had for the past several years.  How will you fulfill your life?… not your work life, your retired life?  How will you use these 60- minute gifts?

beach
Newly Retired? Take a couple weeks of vacation.

Take a couple of “vacation weeks” and decide.  If you want to sleep for two weeks, do it.  If you want to lay on the beach with your toes in the sand, do it. These hours are YOURS!

After decompression from a workweek filled up by others, decide how to arrange this next very important phase of your life? Your expanded life.  Your freed-up life!

Celebrate the end of ‘Ambition at Work’

Continue reading Retirement 1: Creating a Retirement Life Plan

Building Resilience: Key to Positive Aging

Dixie recently wrote a post about positive aging being a state of mind.  Well, yes, and a new study out of the University of California suggests that she’s right and that resilience may be the key to positive aging.

Nature is resilient. Be like nature!

How So?

  • Older adults with health problems but high resilience – the ability to bounce back from negative events – rated their degree of successful aging just as highly as those without health problems.
  • Even those who had struggled with cancer, heart disease, and a range of other problems, but didn’t suffer from depression, rated their degree of successful aging quite highly.

Continue reading Building Resilience: Key to Positive Aging

Retirement Plan Needed: Ask retired people

Direct research through our recent Focus Group discussion provided first-hand information for retirement preparation.  Not the financial part; the what will I do all day part.

Focus group, discussing how to stay positive in retirement.
Shirley, Maura and Jacquie at Focus Group Discussion.

Research includes our own experiences working with seniors in our careers.

However, direct research adds immediate validity to the importance of planning the “daily living” part of retirement.

The participants, all over 55,  live in an active adult community.

  • Some are single, divorced or widowed; some are married.
  • Several participants actively volunteer.
  • A couple of participants work part time.
  • Many are involved in golf, tennis, chorus, book club and church.
  • Most traveled extensively
  • Two boated from “up North” to Florida and one continued to live on their boat.

What would they suggest to incoming retirees?

Continue reading Retirement Plan Needed: Ask retired people

Five Fabulous Ways to Improve Your Memory and Have Fun Doing It!

In my last post about healthy aging, we explored some basic ways to protect the brain.  I promised in that post to provide some additional fun and effective ideas to improve memory for now and in the future.  Here’s a list that can easily be incorporated into daily life.  Choose one or two or go for all of them.

How to Improve Your Memory

You’ll love video games, and so will your brain!
  1. Challenge your brain.  You can read or do crosswords or watch football or play cards or brain games.  Any or all of these are good.  Make it even more effective by doing something new.  If you’ve done crosswords forever, try learning to play video games.  They’re not just for kids. Lots of research shows that the brain loves learning something novel.

Continue reading Five Fabulous Ways to Improve Your Memory and Have Fun Doing It!

Positive Aging: Is Aging a State of Mind?

Did I ever think I would be riding my bike at 73, after two strokes, back surgery and years of Type 1 Diabetes on an insulin pump?       YES!

Here’s an example of Positive Aging:

Many of my neighbors and friends in our 55 plus community comment on how they personally “feel” younger than their age suggests.

I know it’s true for me, 73, as well as for my husband, almost 73.

The question was recently raised, “younger relative to what?”  Personal opinion?

Well, of course!  Only I know whether I feel younger than my parents’ or grandparents’ seemed  at 73.  And my parents were still travelling in their motor home across the country at 73.

Why?   Continue reading Positive Aging: Is Aging a State of Mind?