Retirement 6: Replace your work purpose


 

Retirement is a departure from the purpose of work and also the routine of work.  You already know the compensation ends.  The routine that surrounds and supports your work also ends.

Find your new purpose?

When the purpose ends so does the routine that surrounds and supports your work.   You know the routine that I’m talking about:

  • Preparing clothing for work
  • Planning ahead for fixing dinner. Need to stop at the store on the way home?
  • Buying your lunch?  Fix a lunch.
  • If there’s family, getting them up and off to their destinations.
  • Gas in the car?
  • Setting the alarm for 1-2 hours before starting the commute.
  • The commute. Is it an hour each way? Less? More?  Allow for traffic, weather.
  • To do List to clear up what wasn’t finished yesterday. Start on new projects.
  • Family activities after work?
  • Stop at the dry cleaners.

After retirement, that routine changes drastically.  The drain on your time changes from all the tasks listed above to “What am I going to do today?”  Sure you still need to keep up with the laundry, the meals planned and the family attended to, though they probably have their own homes by now. You have all day to deal with these items and if not today, then tomorrow works too.

Find Your New Purpose

 Now is the time to shift your passions and probe your curiosity to identify your new purpose in retirement.

Purpose evolves as you pass through the many phases of your life.  This may stem from passions from the past or desires at one time or another that you didn’t have time to pursue. In retirement your constraints are lessened because you may be downsizing your home, the kids are through college, the car is paid for, the weddings are over and you are into the next phase.

Positive feedback always feels good. It can happen outside of work.

Now, the “job well done” may only come from inside you after retirement, but the truth of the statement still resonates.  And it may resonate on a much more personal level that will have residuals that far out-distance a title and a salary.

 

 

How do you find purpose?

Continue reading Retirement 6: Replace your work purpose

Retirement 3: 20 Terrific Part Time Jobs

You might be counting down the days to retirement.  I know I was, but I always knew that I’d want to do some kind of work when my “career” came to an end.

Work part time in retirement?

You don’t have to rush into it.  Take some time to bask in the joy of ignoring the alarm clock.  Remember when you were a kid and the early days of June heralded the long and wonderful summer ahead?  That’s how the start of retirement is.  The world opens up before you with endless possibilities.

But if you decide you want to work, how do you get started?  You might want to make a list of all the things you’ve been interested in doing over the years.  Maybe you want to remain in the field where you’ve worked, or maybe you’d like to branch out and try something completely new.

Getting Started!

You may be able to turn your current skill-set into a consulting job or a part-time teaching position, either on-line or in a classroom.  If that’s what you want to do, then finding part time work in those field might be easier while you still have your career position and contacts.  Dixie worked for several years as a marketing consultant when she retired, and I’m still teaching online.  It’s wonderful to get up and work in your pajamas.

If that isn’t feasible and you want to try something you’ve never done like flower arranging or working at the golf course, then a time lapse after retirement shouldn’t hurt your choices.  Go for it. It should be fun.

“According to US News, 60% of workers over sixty look for a job in retirement.”

Run these ideas through your brain!

Continue reading Retirement 3: 20 Terrific Part Time Jobs

Building Resilience: Key to Positive Aging

Dixie recently wrote a post about positive aging being a state of mind.  Well, yes, and a new study out of the University of California suggests that she’s right and that resilience may be the key to positive aging.

Nature is resilient. Be like nature!

How So?

  • Older adults with health problems but high resilience – the ability to bounce back from negative events – rated their degree of successful aging just as highly as those without health problems.
  • Even those who had struggled with cancer, heart disease, and a range of other problems, but didn’t suffer from depression, rated their degree of successful aging quite highly.

Continue reading Building Resilience: Key to Positive Aging

Five Fabulous Ways to Improve Your Memory and Have Fun Doing It!

In my last post about healthy aging, we explored some basic ways to protect the brain.  I promised in that post to provide some additional fun and effective ideas to improve memory for now and in the future.  Here’s a list that can easily be incorporated into daily life.  Choose one or two or go for all of them.

How to Improve Your Memory

You’ll love video games, and so will your brain!
  1. Challenge your brain.  You can read or do crosswords or watch football or play cards or brain games.  Any or all of these are good.  Make it even more effective by doing something new.  If you’ve done crosswords forever, try learning to play video games.  They’re not just for kids. Lots of research shows that the brain loves learning something novel.

Continue reading Five Fabulous Ways to Improve Your Memory and Have Fun Doing It!

Positive Aging: Is Aging a State of Mind?

Did I ever think I would be riding my bike at 73, after two strokes, back surgery and years of Type 1 Diabetes on an insulin pump?       YES!

Here’s an example of Positive Aging:

Many of my neighbors and friends in our 55 plus community comment on how they personally “feel” younger than their age suggests.

I know it’s true for me, 73, as well as for my husband, almost 73.

The question was recently raised, “younger relative to what?”  Personal opinion?

Well, of course!  Only I know whether I feel younger than my parents’ or grandparents’ seemed  at 73.  And my parents were still travelling in their motor home across the country at 73.

Why?   Continue reading Positive Aging: Is Aging a State of Mind?

Healthy Aging: How to Protect Your Brain

Healthy aging depends upon a healthy brain.  How many times do you start to say something only to find that the word or the name that is right there on the tip of your tongue just won’t come?  It happens to me all the time and not only does it frustrate me; it frightens me.

Older brains need workouts too. Work yours out!

I’m frightened of dementia, but I’m also scared of just the ordinary decline in cognitive ability that comes from the normal wear and tear on our brains as we get older.  Our brains can atrophy – just like our muscles – and I want to do everything I can do to prevent or slow that decline.

What can we do to protect our brains?

Continue reading Healthy Aging: How to Protect Your Brain