Downsize, Snowbird or Stay Put?

Relocate? Stay where you are? Second Home? Snowbird?

Before choosing where to live in your new retirement, there are several important questions to consider.

Key questions for choosing where you want to retire.

  1. Are your kids going to move back home?  Do you want them to?
  2. Is your current residence manageable? By manageable, I mean; financially (taxes, mortgage, utilities), physical accessibility, friendly climate, repair and landscape upkeep.)
  3. Do you want to stay in the area you live in?  Or have you dreamed of moving closer to family, the mountains, the coast or a different country or living in an RV or boat?
  4. Are you situated where you can ‘age in place?’
  5. Can you afford to buy a second home to retreat to and fill those desires
  6. Have you thought about the thousands of “snow-birds” who live six months in their “home residence” and six months in their dream location?
  7. Have you thought about a “house swap” to try out those locations?

Evaluate your Answers

Answering these questions will narrow your choices and move you closer to your ultimate plan.

 

 Remember this:  nothing is concrete (except, of course, concrete).  If you make a choice and it doesn’t work for you, it can be changed.

My location certainly has changed during the years I’ve been retired.

Three out of 5 Americans want to spend their golden years in another city or state, according to a national Bankrate survey. A majority said they’d be interested in moving, regardless of gender, income and education, though wanderlust did seem to fade with age.  See this complete article at  bankrate.com/retirement/3-in-5-want-to-retire-somewhere-else/

Look at one couple’s experience:

Several friends of ours have moved into age restricted communities.  These come in all sizes shapes and costs.  Choose something that works with your retirement budget in an area that you are excited about and check it out.

One couple we know moved into a suburban neighborhood.  Being retired with their children grown, graduated from college, working in their careers, married with children, the couple thought that living in a nearby neighborhood would be just the ticket to get to see and be involved with their grand-kids lives.

This worked for a while but then the grand-kids grew and had their own interests and lives as did the other younger neighbors on the couple’s street.  Without the involvement of their own children’s school age kids in sports and activities, they found it difficult to nurture any active social life in this neighborhood so similar in age as their own adult children’s.

Ultimately, they moved to a retirement community where every day offers choices to participate in tennis, golf, dances, theater etc.  Very little effort is required to become involved in an age-restricted community and it’s easy to say yes or no.

The best advantage is that there are so many choices of activities with people who have a lot in common with you.  They felt like they had extended their family.

Downsize, Snowbird or Stay Put

Today the accomplishment of your goals is determined by you, not work constraints or others’ opinions. If you want to accomplish these goals, do so.  If you don’t want to, don’t. Just forget about it. But realize that at this time in your life,  what you do is your choice.

In all of this exploring and self discovery, please remember this: small changes can equal big results.  Eat less, spend less, sit less, stress less, watch TV less, worry less, be active more.  Get up and walk around the block or skip, skate, run or ride your bike.  Your choices equal your results. When you choose a job, neighborhood, location or partner, YOU choose a life.

Homework:  Grab a sheet of paper and brainstorm all your answers to the above questions.  Add a little research, mix it with desire and see what your retirement possibilities reveal.  There are good doctors and dentists, hairdressers and grocery stores most everywhere. So, get started!

Dixie

writers@richlyaged.com

 

 

Learning New Things!

 

Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?? 

Dixie and Pam blogging their book.

I’m pretty sure that was a rumor started by young dogs.  But Boomers don’t buy into that idea.  We never have.  Just look at the changes in our lifetimes! Amazing!  We’re used to learning new things.

I took typing in high school and learned to attain the coveted goal of 60 words per minute on a manual typewriter. The reason that was good, other than an ‘A’ in typing class, is that Personnel offices, (aka Human Resources) always administered typing tests to aspiring Clerk Typists.  The going speed for Clerk Typists B, (the “B” team) was 40 wpm, Clerk typists ‘A’s,  the stars,  earned 50 cents more per hour for their additional 20 wpm.

Try to keep in mind that there were no fancy features like cut and paste or spell check etc.  If you made an error, it was out with the ink eraser trying deftly not to rub a hole in your document paper which was still in the typewriter.  We completed the job  by tapping the correct spelling key over the roughed-up paper.  Duplicate copies were a whole new ballgame.

Second copies were made with a piece of carbon paper between two sheets of paper because this was a world before copy machine availability.  “Start over” was an often-heard response when handing in the company’s proposal to bid for an outside job.

This was followed by an electric typewriter with variable spacing so if you put an ‘o’ where an “m” needed to go, the roughly erased spot wasn’t big enough for the wider “m”.

Remember how we made copies?

Of course, improvements followed for typists’ errors as well.  The carbon had to be corrected by erasing the second sheet, then cutting a small piece of fresh carbon paper and applying it to the second sheet for the keystroke to strike the unused carbon paper.

Brilliant smiles on typists with a collective sigh of relief could be heard when

Wite Out to the rescue, crisis averted!

Bette Nesmith Graham invented liquid correction fluid in 1951!   She was working as a typist and invented the fluid in her kitchen before founding her very successful company, Liquid Paper.

The second paradigm in the lowly but valuable typists’ evolution was, of course, the copy machine.  No more battles with the carbon paper.  All you needed was permission to stand in line at the specially trained “Copy Girl’s” station to have your document, covered in correction fluid, reproduced with a push of a button.  Hail the Copy Machine.

That scenario pretty much held up till the late 1980’s when the first personal desktop computers became readily available in some forward thinking businesses.  Of course by then you were entrusted to take your documents to the copier and make your own copies and correction tools for typists became a thing of the past.

Old dog—new tricks!!

Are you kidding?  The learning curve was well worth the aggravation and time saved by the features offered by Word Processors and Personal computers.

We’re still like that.  Who wants to go back to drying clothes on a clothesline?

Boomers embrace change.  In fact, today’s changes are so rapid fire that very few, young or old, can keep up with the latest.  Check out these inventions from the past 50 years.

At the leading edge of the Baby Boomers, I still remember going to the Ice House in town to buy a block of ice, bring it home and put in the top tray of the “icebox.”  There’s a welcome change!

I’m sure there are things that you have learned in the last 10-20 years that you never imagined you would try.

We’d love to hear about the new tricks you’ve learned in the past few years.

Dixie

Writers@richlyaged.com

Retirement 8: The Self Discovery Process

Self Discovery: Who are You?

 

Self Discovery:  Will the real you please stand up?

Sensational retirements don’t just happen. They take some planning, and the place to start is with you. Take a little time to think about this and begin by asking yourself some questions to peel back the layers and find the “authentic you.”

Drill deep.  It took years of experiences to add those layers and it may take some time to remove the ones you no longer want or need. Write a description of who you believe you are. Link to mind-mapping to try mapping a visual of who you are.

A simple example of mind mapping for self discovery Continue reading Retirement 8: The Self Discovery Process

Retirement 4: Explore Volunteerism for a Happy Retirement

What are other options besides work? Explore Volunteerism!

Volunteer to help others
Volunteer to help those who can’t help themselves.

Find a volunteer gig – not something to fill time, but something that really fulfills you.

Volunteerism is an area that is wide open. Places where you can make a difference both for those you are helping and for helping yourself.  Visit this link offered by the Corporation of National and Community Services.  Whatever your passions are, whatever touches your heart, there are many places that welcome volunteers.

How can you help?

Think about our own life span so far and you will be able to picture the life spans of those who may need some type of help. For example:

  • There are babies to be rocked, and toddlers to be watched.
  • Children need tutoring and teens need mentoring.
  • College kids need a surrogate ‘family-like’ place to regroup.
  • Nurseries need helpers and senior centers need caregivers.
  • Blood banks need donors
  • Missions need teachers.
  • Libraries need storytellers
  • Hospitals need folks ready with a quick smile and a reassuring hand.
  • Election headquarters need campaigners.
  • School field trips need chaperones.
  • Warm meals need delivered.
  • Those disabled need transportation.
  • Lonely folks need company.
Help others, help yourself.
Volunteers are the glue that holds our community together.

The list, like the “beat of the Sixties” that we Boomers are so familiar with, just goes on.

Most of these volunteer opportunities don’t require special skills.  They require the precious gift that you now have, time.  Time is the same commodity that is in short supply when you’re working 40 hours a week.

Research shows there is as much benefit to you from volunteering as there is for those you are helping.

What are some of the benefits of volunteering?

Continue reading Retirement 4: Explore Volunteerism for a Happy Retirement

8 Tips for Living a Balanced Life in Retirement

Are you overcommitted?

You know those balls we’re balancing in the air at all times – the ones that represent what we must do and what we really want to do?  The ones we imagine ourselves managing so efficiently while we live our retirement dream?  Well, mine are not behaving very well at the moment; they seem to be crashing down on my head and falling to the ground in a heap.   What happened to the nice, balanced life I had planned for retirement?

Want a balanced life? Learn to be selective with your commitments.
Want a balanced life? Learn to be selective with your commitments.

“Planning” is probably the operative word here.  Part of my original plan was to “say yes” to pretty much everything during the first year of retirement.  Perhaps that was not a good idea.  I said yes when my nice part-time job asked me to do more.  Lots more.  I said yes to being the co-captain of the tennis team.  I said yes when the opportunity for a second tennis team came up.  I said yes when the neighborhood Christmas party needed a co-chair.  I said yes to dance lessons and an early-morning exercise class.  Not to mention all the regular stuff.  You get the picture.  You’ve probably been there.

Now I’m in search of the balanced life and the quiet mind.

I’ve been researching how to find both, so I’m sharing my new plan – complete with some tips for how to make this all different. Continue reading 8 Tips for Living a Balanced Life in Retirement

Plan for Happy Retirement: ensure Positive Aging

Plan for Retirement to ensure Positive Aging.

Retirement financial planning is and has been available for years. We’ve all saved our pennies, moved them around, counted them repeatedly and planned for our “golden years.”

But what about the “what am I going to do all day part?  Sometimes, lack of planning results in boredom or loneliness.

What’s been missing is a planning guide for everything in retirement life but the financial information. Our “Baby Boomers Guide to Retirement…50 Tips to Freedom” workbook is not about finances or investments or savings.  Continue reading Plan for Happy Retirement: ensure Positive Aging