Managing Retirement Stress

Stress isn’t all bad.  Being mildly stressed can actually help us perform better in a committee presentation or on the tennis court.  It gives us a little edge, and it’s been around forever.  It’s the thing that helped our ancestors outrun the saber-toothed tiger, and though the tiger is long gone, the stress of modern life – even in retirement – can rob us of the joy we seek at this time in our lives.

It’s living with chronic stress – that constant bombardment of worry and anxiety – that’s the real problem.   You know that tight feeling you get in the middle of your chest or the pit of your stomach?  Your heart pounds; your hands get sweaty; and you wake up worrying in the middle of the night.  Eventually, it can lead to health problems by making our hearts work harder and harming our immune systems.    That means that stress management should be a priority for all of us.

Conquer your stress. It'll kill ya!
Conquer your stress. It’ll kill ya!

The good news is that there’s plenty we can do to control the stress in our lives.  All we need is a plan!  In the next few blog posts we’ll be talking about taking steps to conquer stress in our lives.  Let’s get started right away.

Three easy steps to getting started with stress management:

Continue reading Managing Retirement Stress

8 Tips for Living a Balanced Life in Retirement

Are you overcommitted?

You know those balls we’re balancing in the air at all times – the ones that represent what we must do and what we really want to do?  The ones we imagine ourselves managing so efficiently while we live our retirement dream?  Well, mine are not behaving very well at the moment; they seem to be crashing down on my head and falling to the ground in a heap.   What happened to the nice, balanced life I had planned for retirement?

Want a balanced life? Learn to be selective with your commitments.
Want a balanced life? Learn to be selective with your commitments.

“Planning” is probably the operative word here.  Part of my original plan was to “say yes” to pretty much everything during the first year of retirement.  Perhaps that was not a good idea.  I said yes when my nice part-time job asked me to do more.  Lots more.  I said yes to being the co-captain of the tennis team.  I said yes when the opportunity for a second tennis team came up.  I said yes when the neighborhood Christmas party needed a co-chair.  I said yes to dance lessons and an early-morning exercise class.  Not to mention all the regular stuff.  You get the picture.  You’ve probably been there.

Now I’m in search of the balanced life and the quiet mind.

I’ve been researching how to find both, so I’m sharing my new plan – complete with some tips for how to make this all different. Continue reading 8 Tips for Living a Balanced Life in Retirement

Plan for Happy Retirement: ensure Positive Aging

Plan for Retirement to ensure Positive Aging.

Retirement financial planning is and has been available for years. We’ve all saved our pennies, moved them around, counted them repeatedly and planned for our “golden years.”

But what about the “what am I going to do all day part?  Sometimes, lack of planning results in boredom or loneliness.

What’s been missing is a planning guide for everything in retirement life but the financial information. Our “Baby Boomers Guide to Retirement…50 Tips to Freedom” workbook is not about finances or investments or savings.  Continue reading Plan for Happy Retirement: ensure Positive Aging

Trim the Cost of your Haircut

I just kept spending more and more on my hair.  The upkeep was killing me.  It started with $30 precision cuts in the 1970s.  That was quite a bit of money back then, but it seemed worth it.  But soon it was highlights ($50 minimum) along with the haircut which now cost $45. Then along came some grey hair, and that demanded a base color first, followed by highlights, followed by the haircut.  Yikes! One day not too long ago (but while I was still working), I walked out of the salon with a lovely cut and color but $275 dollars added to my credit card bill. Continue reading Trim the Cost of your Haircut

About the writers

pam-and-dixie-2

 

Pam Mangene and Dixie Shaw are two friends who met over forty years ago.  Our paths crossed on our way to a newcomer function in Dallas, Texas in the early 1970s when our children were toddlers.  Now, their children are in high school.

Though we’ve lived on opposite ends of  our nation and our world, we’ve always managed to visit each other, travel together and keep close track of our children, grandchildren and husbands.  We’ve collaborated about many opportunities over the years as our separate careers took us down different paths and now have established a place to share observations on those various stages of life.

More information is available about our backgrounds on later pages but for now, let’s get started.  We would love to hear from you and about your Richly Aged years.

Pam and Dixie

Why this Blog??

Okay.  Why this blog?  The heart and subject of the blog is inevitable aging.  The serendipitous gift of the blog is choice.  So what do we have?  Aging and choice.

Aging, noun, 1) the process of growing old.  2) Adjective, of a thing reaching the end of useful life. Obsolescent.

That doesn’t sound like a lot of happiness, does it!

Choice, noun, 1) an act of choosing or deciding between two or more possibilities.  The power over deciding the outcome.

Now we’re talking.

What are your impressions of aging?  When I was in my twenties and thirties, I thought the milestone sixty was definitely “elderly.”  Now at seventy two, when a novel refers to an elderly woman of sixty, I’m amazed and a little miffed.  Currently I live in an “active adult” community with separate homes, filled with separate singles or  couples, with separate interests and separate histories with one singular restriction.  They must be adults over 55.

Within this community there are groups interested in golf, horseshoes, shuffleboard, bocce ball, tennis, swimming, bike rides, ceramics, art, theater, chorus, dancing, reading, working out, walking, yoga, tai chi, shopping, cards, parties, luncheons, charities, computer, movies, veterans, cooking, and the list goes on. They all have a choice in what they would like to do or even if they want to live here.

Our ages range from 55 to 100+.  We have folks who are grumpy, cheery, funny, irritated, sad, vibrant and helpful.  Having said that, there isn’t anyone in the community who hasn’t had illness, injury, or loss touch our lives.  It’s the inevitable part.  The one gift we have in common is choice.  The choice is how to deal with our circumstances.  To choose to stay positive about whatever phase or place we find ourselves. A choice about how we age?  That works!

Come along with us as we discuss Richly Aged…and loving life!

Dixie